What if God gave us a Do-Over? What if Kristin Flyntz's imaginary letter from the virus to us isn't imaginary after all?

If you haven't yet watched Kristin Flyntz's video (see below), pick up your journal, find a quiet corner, then click on the photo below. As you watch and listen, imagine our species making this earth our home for a mere 200,000 years. Imagine the 4 billion years that the earth has been home to as many as 8 billion other living beings. We are babes in the woods.

Consider, what if the human species is only one of a million sentient species? What if we are not even the most sentient species? What if the earth, and all life on earth, has been trying to have a meaningful conversation with us for thousands of years?

What if we suspend our disbelief, and watch this video with humility, with our senses engaged and our human egos disengaged? What if we suspend our disbelief, like we do when watching movies or reading novels, and pretend (just for 3.5 minutes) that we're not the smartest beings on the planet, that all life carries within it the same miracle of creation.

Click on photo to watch video

What if God says we get a do-over? What would you do differently? What would I do differently?

After you watch the video, pick up your journal and write what your heart is speaking. What would you do differently? What kind of relationship would you like to have with other human beings? What kind of conversation would you like to have with the earth? Do you believe that the earth is listening? That nature is listening? That God is listening?

We are capable of being love, manifested here on earth. But first we must believe in love, in compassion and humbleness and second chances. If we listen, we can learn a new language.


Note: Gratitude to writer Kristin Flyntz for her poem, "An Imagined Letter from Covid-19 to Humans," and to videographer Darinka Montico for her profound companion images.

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